national poetry month

All posts tagged national poetry month

Day 30 – NaPoWriMo 2017 – “NaPoWriMo”

Published 01st May 2017 by viewsofpreethib

Day 30 – And finally, our final prompt – at least until next year! Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem about something that happens again and again (kind of like NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo). It could be the setting of the sun, or your Aunt Georgia telling the same story at Thanksgiving every single year. It could be the swallows returning to Capistrano or how, without fail, you will lock your keys in the car whenever you go to the beach.

NaPoWriMo

Year after year,
New Challenge in April,
New prompts for 30 days,
A new form of poem each day,
Due to NaPoWriMo Challenge.

Year after year,
Your up with gear,
To face new challenge,
A repeated gift for yourself,
Which is NaPoWriMo Challenge.

Year after year,
You write 30 poems,
Along with unknown people,
In the journey you make few new friends,
Due to the NaPoWriMo Challenge.

Year after year,
Brings a smile on your face,
A satisfaction about yourself,
A memory so delightful,
Only due to NaPoWriMo Challenge!

(c) by Preethi.B

 

DAY 29 – NAPOWRIMO 2017 – “Snow”

Published 29th April 2017 by viewsofpreethib

Day 29 – And now for our (optional) prompt. Today, I’d like to challenge you to take one of your favorite poems and find a very specific, concrete noun in it. For example, if your favorite poem is this verse of Emily Dickinson’s, you might choose the word “stones” or “spectre.” After you’ve chosen your word, put the original poem away and spend five minutes free-writing associations – other nouns, adjectives, etc. Then use your original word and the results of your free-writing as the building blocks for a new poem.

My favorite poem is by Robert Frost called “Dust of Snow”.

Dust of Snow

The way a crow
Shook down on me
The dust of snow
From a hemlock tree

Has given my heart
A change of mood
And saved some part
Of a day I had rued.

– Robert Frost

Snow

In the movies I see,
Beautiful scenes,
And how I wish,
To see, feel, experience reality,
Covered in snow,
Are Trees with no leaves,
Benches are lonely,
Streets lights in night are shiny,
Lakes are frozen and icy,
People singing merrily,
Amazing ice skating,
Kids are playing,
Snowman’s at making,
Santa Claus said to come from chimney,
The snow covered bridges are calling,
To see the sight of beauty,
The sight of white,
The snow,
Gives a mystic feeling…

(c) by Preethi.B

Day 28 – NaPoWriMo 2017 – “What Is Love?”

Published 28th April 2017 by viewsofpreethib

Day 28 – And now for our prompt (optional, as always). Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem using Skeltonic verse. Don’t worry, there are no skeletons involved. Rather, Skeltonic verse gets its name from John Skelton, a fifteenth-century English poet who pioneered the use of short stanzas with irregular meter, but two strong stresses per line (otherwise know as “dipodic” or “two-footed” verse). The lines rhyme, but there’s not a rhyme scheme per se. The poet simply rhymes against one word until he or she gets bored and moves on to another. Here is a good explainer of the form, from which I have borrowed this excellent example:

Dipodic What?

Dipodic Verse
will be Terse.
Stress used just twice
to keep it nice,
short or long
a lilting song
or sounding gong
that won’t go wrong
if you adhere
to the rule here,
Now is that clear
My dear?

What is love?

https://skysingularity.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/what-is-love.jpg?w=522&h=391

Does Love,
Come with book of directive?
Is Love,
Addictive?
Does true love,
Exist or is it imaginative?
Can Love,
Be above,
Everything and everyone?
Is love,
Heartache,
And even sacrifice?
Does Love,
Mean different according to their age?
Is Love,
Blind or calculative?
Is Love,
Temporary or evermore?

To express love,
Should one be creative?
When in Love,
Would one always be caressive,
Or would be disruptive & impulsive?
When in love,
Would one be intuitive?
Does true love,
Means one should only give,
In return you expect nothing?

What is love?
Can anybody tell me?

(c) by Preethi.B

DAY 27 – NAPOWRIMO 2017 – “Taste of Dahi Puri”

Published 27th April 2017 by viewsofpreethib

Day 27 – And last but not least, here’s our (optional) prompt! Many poems explore the sight or sound or feel of things, and Proust famously wrote about the memories evoked by smell, but today I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that explores your sense of taste! This could be a poem about food, or wine, or even the oddly metallic sensation of a snowflake on your tongue.

Taste of Dahi Puri!

https://i2.wp.com/www.chocolatetulip.me/uploads/1/2/6/4/12641208/8657156_orig.jpg

Oh, my mouth is salivating,
On hearing the name of the dish,
To try the famous Indian snack, you wish…

A few raw & boiled veggies & few chutneys,
All combined & stuffed in the crispy puffed puris,
Topped with loaded curd, sprinkled with salt & spices,
Garnish with a bit of coriander and sev,
Yuummmm, I can’t wait to taste…

Your mouth is exploded with flavours,
Sweet-tangy, a bit sour along with few spices,
Perfectly balanced flavours that tingles your tongue,
Can also be customised according to one’s taste.

Now, that for you my dear is the Dahi Puri’s Taste.

(c) by Preethi.B

https://viewsofpreethib.files.wordpress.com/2017/04/705f9-dahi-puri-recipe.png?w=392&h=475

DAY 26 – NAPOWRIMO 2017 – “Discovery of Jukebox!”

Published 26th April 2017 by viewsofpreethib

Day 26 – And now for our (optional) prompt! Have you ever heard someone wonder what future archaeologists, whether human or from alien civilization, will make of us? Today, I’d like to challenge you to answer that question in poetic form, exploring a particular object or place from the point of view of some far-off, future scientist? The object or site of study could be anything from a “World’s Best Grandpa” coffee mug to a Pizza Hut, from a Pokemon poster to a cellphone.

Discovery of Jukebox!

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/87/51/9f/87519fee8346913b43ff13ae9a618449.jpg

The archaeologists of 5011 AD,
Found a box of mystery,
A smile and jig of victory,
The “Jukebox” is their discovery.

It is a device that plays music,
When a coin is inserted,
It is a brilliant invention they stated,
As they sent it to the electronics museum.

With their life’s few guarded,
As the antiques found were precious,
In the 1890’s it was invented,
Was told to people who visited the museum,
Looking at jukebox people were spell bounded.

It was such a great invention!

(c) by Preethi.B

Day 24 – NaPoWriMo 2017 – “Fight”

Published 24th April 2017 by viewsofpreethib

Day 24 – Last but not least, our (optional) daily prompt. Today, I challenge you to write a poem of ekphrasis — that is, a poem inspired by a work of art. But I’d also like to challenge you to base your poem on a very particular kind of art – the marginalia of medieval manuscripts. Here you’ll find some characteristic images of rabbits hunting wolves, people sitting on nests of eggs, dogs studiously reading books, and birds wearing snail shells. What can I say? It must have gotten quite boring copying out manuscripts all day, so the monks made their own fun. Hopefully, the detritus of their daydreams will inspire you as well!

Fight!

https://i1.wp.com/i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160608124546-medieval-killer-rabbits-6-super-169.jpg

Sword & shield in hand,
The brave one has come to fight,
Against the weird snail-man outright,
On the white beast like a knight.

Fearless & upright,
Planning to mortify the weird snail-man,
Ready to strike,
Will the hare win the fight?

(c) by Preethi.B

 

Day 23 – NaPoWriMo 2017 – “Love & BFF”

Published 23rd April 2017 by viewsofpreethib

Day 23 – Our daily prompt (optional, as always). Our prompt for Day Twenty-Three comes to us from Gloria Gonsalves, who challenges us to write a double elevenie. What’s that? Well, an elevenie is an eleven-word poem of five lines, with each line performing a specific task in the poem. The first line is one word, a noun. The second line is two words that explain what the noun in the first line does, the third line explains where the noun is in three words, the fourth line provides further explanation in four words, and the fifth line concludes with one word that sums up the feeling or result of the first line’s noun being what it is and where it is. There are some good examples in the link above.

A double elevenie would have two stanzas of five lines each, and twenty-two words in all. It might be fun to try to write your double elevenie based on two nouns that are opposites, like sun and moon, or mountain and sea.

Love & BFF!

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/cf/66/63/cf66634486d3bb0d1e2f72c73427be9c.jpg

Roses,
Brings Happiness,
In the hands,
Whom it is given,
Loved!

Teddy-bear,
Gives comfort,
Arms, bed, floor,
In contentment or heartbroken,
BFF*!

(c) by Preethi.B

BFF – Best Friend Forever